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Roast goose with port gravy recipe

Roast goose with port gravy recipe



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  • Side dish
  • Sauce
  • Gravy

I've made this roast goose several times and it is fantastic. A perfect Christmas dinner!

46 people made this

IngredientsServes: 10

  • 1 whole goose
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 4 slices crusty bread
  • 3 onions
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 2 carrots
  • 250ml (9 fl oz) boiling water
  • 250ml (9 fl oz) dry white wine
  • 4 tablespoons tawny port
  • 5 tablespoons plain flour
  • 750ml (1 1/4 pints) chicken stock

MethodPrep:30min ›Cook:3hr ›Ready in:3hr30min

  1. Discard loose fat from goose. Remove neck, cut into large pieces and reserve. Rinse goose inside and out and pat dry. Pierce skin of goose all over and season with salt and pepper.
  2. Loosely pack neck cavity with enough bread to fill. Fold neck skin under body and fasten with a small skewer.
  3. Quarter 1 onion and all the celery, and place inside the body cavity of the goose. Tie legs together loosely with kitchen string or insert legs through slit in lower skin flap. Transfer goose breast side up to a rack set in a deep roasting tin.
  4. Cut remaining 2 onions and carrots into large pieces. Scatter onion and carrot, neck pieces and giblets in roasting tin. Roast goose at 220 C / Gas mark 7 in the middle of the oven for 30 minutes.
  5. Reduce temperature to 160 C / Gas mark 3. Carefully pour boiling water over goose; juices may splatter. Continue roasting goose, skimming off fat and basting with juices using a metal bulb baster every 20 minutes. Cook for 2 to 2 1/2 hours more, or until a meat thermometer inserted in fleshy part of thigh registers 80 C. When done, the juices should run clear when thigh is pierced with a fork.
  6. Transfer goose to a heated platter. Remove skewer and discard string. Keep goose warm and loosely covered with aluminium foil until ready to serve.
  7. With a slotted spoon, discard vegetables, neck pieces and giblets from tin. Spoon off fat from pan juices and reserve. On top of the hob, deglaze the tin with white wine and port over moderately high heat, stirring to scrape up brown bits. Add chicken stock and boil mixture until reduced by about half.
  8. In a 3 litre heavy saucepan, whisk together 4 tablespoons reserved fat and flour; cook roux over moderately low heat, whisking to prevent lumps. Whisk wine mixture into the roux. Bring gravy to the boil, whisking constantly. Turn down heat. Simmer gravy, whisking frequently, for 5 minutes or until thickened. Season gravy with salt and pepper. Transfer gravy to a heated sauceboat.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(26)

Reviews in English (24)

by breadlover

Excellent recipe, but 1 point to make. Use the fat removed prior to cooking by making goose-fat pastry. For the pastry: remove the large, visible chunks of fat you'll see inside the raw goose. They are obvious. Put them in a pan with some cold water and heat very slowly until melted. Cool, then chill in the fridge. Lift off the fat; freeze it. For ordinary shortcrust pastry use 2oz of fat to 7oz of flour, plus salt as usual. Grate the frozen fat into the flour, rubbing in in the normal way, then binding with very cold water. Rest, then use. PS I always add some lemon juice before the cold water. (Goose fat has a very low boiling point, so it has to be frozen to make pastry).-21 Jul 2008

I love goose at Christmas! The goose fat I collect lasts us all year and is very healthy fat being mono-unsaturated. Have a look at the nutrition and health page on this website. There are also some nice recipes!http://www.goosefat.co.uk/page/home-12 Nov 2012

by Jenn

This is a great recipe for any time of year, and the gravy is absolutely gorgeous.-21 Jul 2008


  • 1 (10 pound) whole goose
  • sea salt to taste
  • ½ orange
  • ½ lemon
  • ½ Granny Smith apple
  • 2 tablespoons goose fat
  • 1 cup cherries, pitted and halved
  • 1 cup port wine
  • 1 ½ teaspoons grated fresh ginger root
  • ¼ cup thinly sliced green onion
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons soy sauce
  • ½ cup chicken stock

Preheat an oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Use a fork to prick the goose all over. Do not go into the meat, just through the skin. Season inside and out with sea salt, stuff with the orange, lemon, and apple tie the wings behind the bird with cooking twine. Place breast-side-down into a roasting pan, and fill with 1/2-inch of water.

Bake in the preheated oven for 45 minutes, then remove from the oven. Turn the goose breast-side-up, and prick the skin with a fork again. Add water to the pan to bring the level back up to 1/2-inch. Return the goose to the oven, and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh, near the bone reads 170 degrees F (75 degrees C), about 2 hours. Remove from the oven, and cover loosely with aluminum foil to rest.

Spoon 2 tablespoons of goose fat from the roasting pan into a small saucepan, and heat over medium heat. Stir in the cherries and cook until the cherries have softened and begun to release their juice, about 10 minutes. Stir in the port wine, and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil for 2 minutes, then stir in the ginger, green onion, sugar, soy sauce, and chicken stock. Return to a boil, then reduce heat to medium, and simmer until the sauce has reduced by half, or to your desired consistency, about 10 minutes. Serve the sauce alongside the goose.


Roast Goose, the Mrs Beeton way

With Christmas approaching, we are looking towards the food we’ll share on the day itself. If you’re looking for ideas, who better to consult that Mrs Isabella Beeton herself, who authored the seminal Household Management at just 22 years old. Below is her sage advice on that classic Christmas meat, roast goose.

Ingredients:
Goose
4 large onions
10 sage-leaves
¼ lb. of bread crumbs
1 ½ oz. of butter
salt and pepper to taste
1 egg

Choosing and Trussing
Select a goose with a clean white skin, plump breast, and yellow feet: if these latter are red, the bird is old. Should the weather permit, let it hang for a few days: by so doing, the flavour will be very much improved. Pluck, singe, draw, and carefully wash and wipe the goose cut off the neck close to the back, leaving the skin long enough to turn over cut off the feet at the first joint, and separate the pinions at the first joint. Beat the breast-bone flat with a rolling-pin, put a skewer though the under part of each wing, and having drawn up the legs closely, put a skewer into the middle of each, and pass the same quite through the body. Insert another skewer into the small of the leg, bring it close down to the side bone, run it through, and do the same to the other side. Now cut off the end of the vent, and make a hole in the skin sufficiently large for the passage of the rump, in order to keep in the seasoning.

Mode
Make a sage-and-onion stuffing of the above ingredients put it into the body of the goose, and secure it firmly at both ends, by passing the rump through the hole made in the skin, and the other end by tying the skin of the neck to the back by this means the seasoning will not escape. Put it down to a brisk fire, keep it well basted, and roast from 1 ½ to 2 hours, according to the size. Remove the skewers, and serve with a tureen of good gravy, and one of well-made apple-sauce. Should a very highly-flavoured seasoning be preferred, the onions should not be parboiled, but minced raw: of the two methods, the mild seasoning in far superior. A ragout, or pie, should be made of the giblets, or they may be stewed down to make gravy. Be careful to serve the goose before the breast falls, or its appearance will be spoiled by coming flattened to the table. As this is rather a troublesome joint to carve, a large quantity of gravy should not be poured round the goose, but sent in a tureen.

Time – A large goose, 1 ¾ hour a moderate-sized one, 1 ¼ hour to 1 ½ hour.

Seasonable from September to March but in perfection from Michaelmas to Christmas.

Average cost, 5s. 6d. each. Sufficient for 8 or 9 persons.

Note
A teaspoon of made mustard, a saltspoonful of salt, a few grains of cayenne, mixed with a glass of port wine, are sometimes poured into the goose by a slit made in the apron. This sauce is, by many persons, considered an improvement.

Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management is a founding text of Victorian middle-class identity. It offers highly authoritative advice on subjects as diverse as fashion, child-care, animal husbandry, poisons, and the management of servants. The Oxford World’s Classics edition is an abridged version, edited by Nicola Humble, which does justice to its high status as a cookery book, while also suggesting ways of approaching this massive, hybrid text as a significant document of social and cultural history.

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Prepare the goose

Pull the giblets out of the cavity. Refrigerate the liver for use in the stuffing and set the other giblets aside for the broth. Tear off any loose deposits of fat from inside the cavity openings. With a chef’s knife, cut off and reserve the two long outermost sections of each wing, leaving only the section nearest the breast still attached. Next, with a paring knife, prick holes in the skin around the thighs, being careful not to cut into the meat. Finally, season the goose generously inside and out with salt and pepper. Set on a rack on a baking sheet and refrigerate, uncovered, overnight.

Make the broth and start the stuffing

Using a cleaver, chop the neck and wings into 4-inch sections. Pat dry with paper towels. Heat the oil in a 5-quart soup pot over medium heat. Add the neck, wings, and giblets (excluding the liver). Cook, turning occasionally, until browned on all sides, 10 to 15 minutes. Add the onion, carrot, celery, thyme, and bay leaf and stir. Add 1 quart water and a small pinch of salt and bring to a boil. Immediately reduce the heat to medium low and simmer gently for 2 hours. Strain, discarding the solids, and cool to room temperature before refrigerating. You should have 1-1/3 to 1-3/4 cups broth.

Combine the prunes and brandy for the stuffing in a small bowl, cover, and steep overnight. Arrange the bread cubes for the stuffing on a baking sheet and set aside, uncovered, to dry overnight.

Steam the goose

Put the goose breast side up on a V-rack in a large flameproof roasting pan with sides at least 3 inches high. Set the pan on the top of the stove over the largest burner and add about 1 inch of water. Cover the roasting pan tightly with heavy-duty foil (or with the domed lid if using a covered roaster). Bring to a boil and lower the heat so the water just simmers. Steam the goose for 40 minutes. Check the liquid occasionally to make sure it hasn’t evaporated and add hot water if necessary. Turn off the heat and uncover the pan, being careful of the steam. Remove the goose and rack from the pan and set aside for 20 to 30 minutes until cool enough to handle.

Make the stuffing and roast the goose

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 325°F. Spoon 2 Tbs. rendered goose fat from the steaming liquid in the roasting pan (reserving the rest) and put it in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the goose liver and sauté, turning a few times, until it browns and feels springy, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board to cool. Return the skillet to medium heat and add the celery, onion, garlic, thyme, and 1/2 tsp. each salt and pepper. Stir, cover, and reduce the heat to medium low. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are soft, 10 to 12 minutes.

Transfer the vegetables to a large mixing bowl. Stir in the bread cubes, soaked prunes, parsley, orange and lemon zests, and 1/2 tsp. salt. Chop the liver and add it to the bowl. Check the goose for pinfeathers or quills—these are most often found around the legs. Remove any with strong tweezers or pliers. Using a large spoon, loosely fill the large cavity of the goose with stuffing. If there is any leftover stuffing, use it to fill the smaller neck cavity.

Pour the steaming liquid from the roasting pan into a clean vessel and leave at room temperature until cool. When the liquid and fat are cool enough to handle, spoon the fat off, set aside 2 Tbs. for the gravy, and reserve the rest for cooking discard the water.

Return the roasting rack and goose to the roasting pan. Roast for 1-1/2 hours and then rotate the pan for even cooking. Continue roasting until the meat on the drumsticks feels very soft when pressed, 1/2 to 1 hour more. You can also check that the thigh (near the joint) is 175°F to 180°F and that the stuffing is at least 165°F. Remove the goose from the oven.

Set the goose in a draft-free spot to rest for 20 to 45 minutes. If the kitchen is cool, tent the bird loosely with foil.

Make the gravy

Pour off the fat from the roasting pan, being careful to leave behind all the tasty pan drippings. Set the roasting pan over medium heat on the largest burner and add the wine, stirring and scraping with a wooden spoon to loosen all the pan drippings. Bring to a boil and reduce by about half, stirring often, about 3 minutes. Scrape the contents of the roasting pan into a strainer set over a bowl.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, heat the 2 Tbs. reserved goose fat. Whisk in the flour and continue whisking for about 1 minute. Slowly whisk in the liquid from the roasting pan and then whisk in the broth. Simmer, whisking frequently, until thickened and full-flavored, about 5 minutes. Whisk in the jelly until melted. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and keep warm while you carve the goose.

Serve the goose and stuffing with the gravy on the side.

To drink: Try the Juan Gil Monastrell 2006 ($16) from Jumilla, Spain. It’s zesty and spicy, with deep layers of cassis and a long finish.


Roast Crown of Goose with Citrus Gravy

For such a big bird, goose is surprisingly meagre on the breast-meat front and I find a crown only yields enough meat to feed two of us. Perhaps we have very big appetites! Or were greedy! Anyway, the meat that it does give up is extremely tasty: dense and gamey. Its fantastic with a fruity sauce, such as cranberry, and a citrussy gravy, flavoured with the clementines and lemons I used as a trivet when the bird was roasting.

I started with a whole goose and removed the legs for another recipe, but you can also buy goose crowns (the back and breasts) on their own.

1 crown of goose, weighing approx. 1 kg
1 clementine, halved
1 lemon, halved
Rock salt

Pan juices from the goose, once youve drained off the fat (there will be a lot)
500ml chicken stock
1 glass white wine
1 tsp dried thyme
Juice from the clementine and lemon
1 tsp cornflour, mixed into a paste with 2 tsp water, to thicken the gravy

Two large handfuls curly kale, stalked removed, boiled in salted water for 5 mins
Roast potatoes, made with Maris Pipers, peeled, parboiled, then roasted in goose fat for 45 mins at 200C/Gas 6
Roast carrots, made with peeled chunks of carrot, cooked alongside the potatoes
Cranberry sauce, from a jar

1. Preheat the oven to 200C/Gas 6. Lay the clementine and lemon halves in a deep roasting tin and put the goose crown on top of them. With a sharp knife, stab the goose skin all over, but dont go as deep as the meat. This will help release the fat during cooking.

2. Rub the skin all over with freshly ground rock salt, then put in the oven. Cook for 1 hour.

3. Once the goose is cooked, carefully remove it from the roasting tin with a pair of tongs and transfer to a plate. Cover with tin foil and leave for 30 mins.

4. Drain the excess fat from the roasting tin into a jar and save to make roast potatoes another time. It freezes well, for several months.

5. To make the gravy, put the roasting tin on the hob, turn up the heat, and add a glass of wine. Use a wooden spoon to de-glaze the roasting tin, then add the stock, thyme and citrus juices. Bring to the boil, stirring constantly, before add the conroflour paste. Stir to thicken the gravy.

6. Use a carving fork to hold the goose in place, then use a sharp knife to carefully carve away each breast from the crown, so that they are whole. Now carve into thick slices, across the grain of the breast.

7. Serve with roast potatoes, roast carrots, curly kale, cranberry sauce and the citrus gravy.


Roast Goose

If goose is frozen, place it in the refrigerator overnight to thaw. Remove goose from the refrigerator, and let it stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Rinse goose inside and out with cold running water, and pat it dry with paper towels. Trim as much of the excess fat as possible from the opening of the cavity. Remove the first and second joints of the wings, and set them aside for use in making the stock.

With the point of a sharp knife, prick the entire surface of the goose skin, being careful not to cut into the flesh. Fold the neck flap under the body of the goose, and pin the flap down with a wooden toothpick. Generously sprinkle the cavity with salt and pepper, and insert 2 carrot halves, 2 celery-stalk halves, garlic, thyme, and sage. Using a piece of kitchen twine, tie the legs together. Generously sprinkle the outside of the goose with salt and pepper, and place it, breast-side up on a wire rack set in a large roasting pan.

Roast goose in the oven until it turns a golden brown, about 1 hour. With a baster, remove as much fat as possible from the roasting pan every 30 minutes. Reduce the heat to 325 degrees, and roast until the goose is very well browned all over and an instant-read thermometer inserted into a breast, not touching a bone, registers 180 degrees, about 1 hour after reducing the temperature.

Meanwhile, prepare goose stock, which will be used when making the gravy and the dressing. Trim and discard any excess fat from the wing tips, neck, and giblets, and place them in a small stockpot. Add 4 carrot halves, 4 celery-stalk halves, both onion halves, parsley, bay leaf, peppercorns, and enough water to cover the bones and vegetables by 1 inch (about 2 1/2 quarts water). Place the stockpot over high heat, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium low, and simmer stock, skimming the scum as it forms, for 2 hours. Strain stock through a cheesecloth-lined strainer. Remove and discard the fat floating on the surface of the stock, and set the stockpot aside.

Remove goose from the oven, and transfer it to a cutting board that has a well. Let the goose stand 15 to 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare the gravy. Pour off all the fat from the roasting pan, and place the pan over high heat. Pour in wine, and cook, stirring up any brown bits with a wooden spoon until the cooking liquid is reduced by three-quarters. Add 2 cups goose stock, and cook, stirring until the liquid is again reduced by three-quarters. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in butter, and cook until slightly thickened. Pass the gravy through a cheesecloth-lined strainer into a gravy boat, and serve with the goose.


Roast Christmas Goose Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 small goose, dressed
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 apples
  • 1 celery leaf
  • 1/2 onion
  • 3 sprigs parsley
  • Stuffing for Roast Goose:
  • 1 cup (250 ml) dry red wine
  • 1 cup consomme
  • giblets from goose
  • 1 carrot, cut up
  • 1 onion, cut in half
  • 6 peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 3 sprigs parsley
  • For Sauce:
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon dry red wine

Method

Step 1

Rinse the goose with cold water and dry well Season it with salt and freshly ground black pepper inside and outside. Stuff the goose with the apples, celery leaf, onion, and parsley. Close the opening with a metal skewer and place on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Bake at 400° F(200 °C) for 1 hour.

Step 2

Turn the goose and continue to roast for another hour. While the goose is, put all the ingredients in the second section in a pot and bring slowly to a boil. Reduce the heat and let simmer for about 45 minutes. Strain and reserve. After the goose roasted for 2 hours, remove it from the oven and pour off all the fat. (This is wonderful for making home fried potatoes)

Step 3

Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F(177°C) and roast the goose for another 1½ to 2 hours, basting every 15 minutes with reserved stock. Remove the roast goose from oven and put on a preheated serving platter. Thicken the gravy with the flour, butter, and wine mixture and serve in a gravy boat. Before serving the roast goose, remove the skewer, parsley, onion, and celery leaf, but the apples with it. Decorate the platter with roast goose attractively with fresh parsley and cranberry sauce in scooped out oranges(add an orange peel to the sauce).


Roast Goose Recipe

Note: it is quite usual and traditional to roast a Goose (and present it to guests) with the wings and legs still attached, however you can, if you wish, present the bird without the wings – to do so cut them off cleanly before roasting.

Prepare the stuffing in advance if you are using it (this can be made the previous day).

Recipe Ingredients:

For The Roast Goose

  • 1 whole goose, (free-range) giblets removed and kept (about 5kg / 10lbs in weight)
  • A few sage leaves, a few sprigs of thyme and a sprig of rosemary (leaves only)
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 2 tsp whole black peppercorns

For The Roasting Tray (to make the gravy)

  • the giblets from the goose, (particularly the neck)
  • 2 onions, (peeled and chopped roughly)
  • 3 carrots (peeled and chopped roughly)
  • 1 orange, quartered, (remove any obvious pips)
  • A few sprigs of rosemary
  • A few sprigs of thyme
  • A few leaves of sage
  • A few bay leaves
  • 3 tbsp of water

For The Stuffing

For The Roast Potatoes

For the Port And Orange Gravy

Recipe Method:

Prepare The Goose And Roasting Tray

Allow the goose to reach room temperature for a couple of hours before you cook it (make sure the Goose is not frozen) remove any giblets or modern plastic bags etc. from inside the cavity. Wash the Goose inside and out under clean running water and leave to drain. Trim any excess fat from the cavity openings and neck – on a personal note I am quite strict in trimming the bird down as much as possible. Pat the goose dry with some paper kitchen towel. Lightly score the skin in a diamond pattern with a sharp knife, taking care not to cut through to the flesh.

Season the Goose all over with a ‘rub’: this is gently rubbing in ground herbs and spices with your hands, all over the lightly scored skin. To make the seasoning rub, use a pestle and mortar (or spice grinder) and add to it the sea salt, whole black peppercorns and the finely chopped fresh herb leaves of sage, rosemary and thyme – grind this mixture until a fine rub is made. There is no need to do anything else to the Goose: modern cooks putting on fancy glazes etc. spoil the wonderful natural taste of the crispy skin and juicy meat done this way.

Into the bottom of a large, heavy-based roasting tray add all the giblets, vegetables and herb ingredients intended for it. Then place a raised wire rack into the roasting tin over the vegetables for the Goose to sit on. If you do not have a wire rack sit the goose on the vegetables to raise it up.

Prepare The Stuffing In Advance:

See this recipe and make a wonderful Sage and Onion Stuffing, made with sausage-meat, chestnuts and apple.

To Roast The Goose:

Stuff the goose with the suggested stuffing (this is optional). Pack the stuffing in deep towards the neck, but leave the top of the cavity free, for hot air to circulate whilst roasting. Weigh the bird with the stuffing to calculate the length of the cooking time – see calculating cooking times below.

Then cover the legs and wings of the goose in foil – wrap them up tight to stop them burning. Place the fully prepared goose onto the raised wire rack in the roasting tin, (above the vegetables) and then cover it over in foil, or put the lid on the roasting tray.

1. Put the goose into the preheated oven at 220C.

2. After 45 minutes of roasting turn the oven down to 180C

Calculate Cooking Times

The goose will take roughly 25-30 minutes per 450g (1 lb) So a 5kg (10lb) Goose will take about 4 and half to 5 hours hours to cook. IMPORTANT: Do not forget to include the weight of the stuffing inside the goose if using it.

During Roasting

When roasting the goose check the fat level in the roasting tin occasionally, empty it carefully if it needs it. Note: even in a large roasting tray I will empty the fat out at least once, normally with an hour to go – which is perfect timing to make the Roast Potatoes with it.

An hour before the finish time remove the foil from over the Goose and from the legs and wings. This is to get the skin to crisp up and get a good colour.

Test The Goose Is Cooked

When the roast goose has had its allotted time remove it from the oven and test that the meat is cooked through. To do this you need to insert the point of a knife, (or skewer) into the meat, close to the joint where the legs join the body. Let the juice trickle onto the knife. If the juice runs clear (no blood) the goose is cooked. Test in several other places to make sure. A modern meat thermometer or probe is also excellent to use.

If it needs longer put it back in the oven, do not serve underdone roast meat. However, the meat should still be juicy and moist, so try not to over cook it either.

Lift the roast goose off the wire rack onto a serving plate and leave it to ‘rest’ in a warm place under some loosely tented foil, for at least 30 minutes: do not carve straight away.

Pour off most of the fat from the roasting tray, leaving any brown bits, vegetables, herbs and tasty juices etc. in the bottom to use as the starting point for gravy (see below).

When ready to serve, use a sharp carving knife and meat fork to carve slices of meat and the stuffing pulled out of the cavity. This can be done at the table in front of guests for Christmas and serve with roast potatoes cooked in the goose fat.

For The Port And Orange Gravy

  • 2 tbsp Plain flour
  • 60ml Red Wine Vinegar
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar (demerara)
  • 1 orange, juice and grated zest
  • 500ml of fresh chicken stock
  • 100ml Port (Ruby)
  • 4 tbsp Redcurrant jelly
  • tray of roasting juices, veg and herbs

Remove the roasted Goose to its carving plate and remove the raised rack. Drain off all the fat and all but 6 tbsp of the cooking juices from the goose roasting tin (remove the orange wedges, but you can leave any herbs, onion, carrot and giblets etc. in and mash them down into the gravy, they will be sieved out later).

Put the roasting tin directly over a medium heat on the cooker hob, and using the back of a fork or potato-masher to mash any remaining veg, herbs and giblets down into the juices. Stir in the plain flour and cook until the mixture is golden and the raw flour has ‘cooked out’.

Pour in the red wine vinegar and add the demerara sugar and cook for 1 min, stirring continuously and continue to mash everything down. Sieve this mixture from the roasting tray into a medium saucepan, squeeze out of the veg any remaining juice in the sieve.

Bring the strained gravy in the saucepan back up to a boil and gradually stir in the orange juice, the chicken stock, the port, the redcurrant jelly and any juices that have come out of the goose whilst it has been resting on its serving plate. Simmer the gravy and reduce the volume by a quarter or a half to thicken.

Pour the gravy once more through a fine sieve into a gravy boat or jug, garnish it with the grated orange zest.

Note on cooking and using the Goose Fat: Roast Goose is very fatty (which is the main reason for its decline in popularity over the 20th Century) and it needs to be roasted above the roasting tray bottom so the fat can drip down into it and away from the Goose.

If you have a small / shallow roasting tray you will need to check the fat level in the roasting tin several times as the goose cooks, to make sure it is not too full. If the tray fills you will need to carefully tip the fat from it, through a fine sieve, into a heat-proof bowl. The fat will then, over a ten minute period, start to separate, with any impurities settling to the bottom of the bowl.

However, the upside to releasing the Goose Fat is its usefulness as a roasting fat for vegetables – there is no better fat to Roast Potatoes with. The fat when clarified can be stored in the freezer in small pots for over 12 months – each pot can roast 1 set of vegetables through out the year.

Note on Stuffing a Goose:Most of the time we cook the stuffing separately in a tray, this reduces roasting times and allows hot air to circulte inside the bird, improving the reliability of roasting. However, for special occasions, like Mrs. Cratchet in ‘A Christmas Carol’, if you want to present the bird with stuffing cooked inside it remember that when calculating roasting times it is important to weigh the goose with the stuffing inside before roasting, to make sure you know how long to cook it for: this way you will get a perfect Roast Goose. Stuffing a bird like a turkey keeps the cavity area moist, but this is not that necessary with a goose.


Roast Goose Recipe

Note: it is quite usual and traditional to roast a Goose (and present it to guests) with the wings and legs still attached, however you can, if you wish, present the bird without the wings – to do so cut them off cleanly before roasting.

Prepare the stuffing in advance if you are using it (this can be made the previous day).

Recipe Ingredients:

For The Roast Goose

  • 1 whole goose, (free-range) giblets removed and kept (about 5kg / 10lbs in weight)
  • A few sage leaves, a few sprigs of thyme and a sprig of rosemary (leaves only)
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 2 tsp whole black peppercorns

For The Roasting Tray (to make the gravy)

  • the giblets from the goose, (particularly the neck)
  • 2 onions, (peeled and chopped roughly)
  • 3 carrots (peeled and chopped roughly)
  • 1 orange, quartered, (remove any obvious pips)
  • A few sprigs of rosemary
  • A few sprigs of thyme
  • A few leaves of sage
  • A few bay leaves
  • 3 tbsp of water

For The Stuffing

For The Roast Potatoes

For the Port And Orange Gravy

Recipe Method:

Prepare The Goose And Roasting Tray

Allow the goose to reach room temperature for a couple of hours before you cook it (make sure the Goose is not frozen) remove any giblets or modern plastic bags etc. from inside the cavity. Wash the Goose inside and out under clean running water and leave to drain. Trim any excess fat from the cavity openings and neck – on a personal note I am quite strict in trimming the bird down as much as possible. Pat the goose dry with some paper kitchen towel. Lightly score the skin in a diamond pattern with a sharp knife, taking care not to cut through to the flesh.

Season the Goose all over with a ‘rub’: this is gently rubbing in ground herbs and spices with your hands, all over the lightly scored skin. To make the seasoning rub, use a pestle and mortar (or spice grinder) and add to it the sea salt, whole black peppercorns and the finely chopped fresh herb leaves of sage, rosemary and thyme – grind this mixture until a fine rub is made. There is no need to do anything else to the Goose: modern cooks putting on fancy glazes etc. spoil the wonderful natural taste of the crispy skin and juicy meat done this way.

Into the bottom of a large, heavy-based roasting tray add all the giblets, vegetables and herb ingredients intended for it. Then place a raised wire rack into the roasting tin over the vegetables for the Goose to sit on. If you do not have a wire rack sit the goose on the vegetables to raise it up.

Prepare The Stuffing In Advance:

See this recipe and make a wonderful Sage and Onion Stuffing, made with sausage-meat, chestnuts and apple.

To Roast The Goose:

Stuff the goose with the suggested stuffing (this is optional). Pack the stuffing in deep towards the neck, but leave the top of the cavity free, for hot air to circulate whilst roasting. Weigh the bird with the stuffing to calculate the length of the cooking time – see calculating cooking times below.

Then cover the legs and wings of the goose in foil – wrap them up tight to stop them burning. Place the fully prepared goose onto the raised wire rack in the roasting tin, (above the vegetables) and then cover it over in foil, or put the lid on the roasting tray.

1. Put the goose into the preheated oven at 220C.

2. After 45 minutes of roasting turn the oven down to 180C

Calculate Cooking Times

The goose will take roughly 25-30 minutes per 450g (1 lb) So a 5kg (10lb) Goose will take about 4 and half to 5 hours hours to cook. IMPORTANT: Do not forget to include the weight of the stuffing inside the goose if using it.

During Roasting

When roasting the goose check the fat level in the roasting tin occasionally, empty it carefully if it needs it. Note: even in a large roasting tray I will empty the fat out at least once, normally with an hour to go – which is perfect timing to make the Roast Potatoes with it.

An hour before the finish time remove the foil from over the Goose and from the legs and wings. This is to get the skin to crisp up and get a good colour.

Test The Goose Is Cooked

When the roast goose has had its allotted time remove it from the oven and test that the meat is cooked through. To do this you need to insert the point of a knife, (or skewer) into the meat, close to the joint where the legs join the body. Let the juice trickle onto the knife. If the juice runs clear (no blood) the goose is cooked. Test in several other places to make sure. A modern meat thermometer or probe is also excellent to use.

If it needs longer put it back in the oven, do not serve underdone roast meat. However, the meat should still be juicy and moist, so try not to over cook it either.

Lift the roast goose off the wire rack onto a serving plate and leave it to ‘rest’ in a warm place under some loosely tented foil, for at least 30 minutes: do not carve straight away.

Pour off most of the fat from the roasting tray, leaving any brown bits, vegetables, herbs and tasty juices etc. in the bottom to use as the starting point for gravy (see below).

When ready to serve, use a sharp carving knife and meat fork to carve slices of meat and the stuffing pulled out of the cavity. This can be done at the table in front of guests for Christmas and serve with roast potatoes cooked in the goose fat.

For The Port And Orange Gravy

  • 2 tbsp Plain flour
  • 60ml Red Wine Vinegar
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar (demerara)
  • 1 orange, juice and grated zest
  • 500ml of fresh chicken stock
  • 100ml Port (Ruby)
  • 4 tbsp Redcurrant jelly
  • tray of roasting juices, veg and herbs

Remove the roasted Goose to its carving plate and remove the raised rack. Drain off all the fat and all but 6 tbsp of the cooking juices from the goose roasting tin (remove the orange wedges, but you can leave any herbs, onion, carrot and giblets etc. in and mash them down into the gravy, they will be sieved out later).

Put the roasting tin directly over a medium heat on the cooker hob, and using the back of a fork or potato-masher to mash any remaining veg, herbs and giblets down into the juices. Stir in the plain flour and cook until the mixture is golden and the raw flour has ‘cooked out’.

Pour in the red wine vinegar and add the demerara sugar and cook for 1 min, stirring continuously and continue to mash everything down. Sieve this mixture from the roasting tray into a medium saucepan, squeeze out of the veg any remaining juice in the sieve.

Bring the strained gravy in the saucepan back up to a boil and gradually stir in the orange juice, the chicken stock, the port, the redcurrant jelly and any juices that have come out of the goose whilst it has been resting on its serving plate. Simmer the gravy and reduce the volume by a quarter or a half to thicken.

Pour the gravy once more through a fine sieve into a gravy boat or jug, garnish it with the grated orange zest.

Note on cooking and using the Goose Fat: Roast Goose is very fatty (which is the main reason for its decline in popularity over the 20th Century) and it needs to be roasted above the roasting tray bottom so the fat can drip down into it and away from the Goose.

If you have a small / shallow roasting tray you will need to check the fat level in the roasting tin several times as the goose cooks, to make sure it is not too full. If the tray fills you will need to carefully tip the fat from it, through a fine sieve, into a heat-proof bowl. The fat will then, over a ten minute period, start to separate, with any impurities settling to the bottom of the bowl.

However, the upside to releasing the Goose Fat is its usefulness as a roasting fat for vegetables – there is no better fat to Roast Potatoes with. The fat when clarified can be stored in the freezer in small pots for over 12 months – each pot can roast 1 set of vegetables through out the year.

Note on Stuffing a Goose:Most of the time we cook the stuffing separately in a tray, this reduces roasting times and allows hot air to circulte inside the bird, improving the reliability of roasting. However, for special occasions, like Mrs. Cratchet in ‘A Christmas Carol’, if you want to present the bird with stuffing cooked inside it remember that when calculating roasting times it is important to weigh the goose with the stuffing inside before roasting, to make sure you know how long to cook it for: this way you will get a perfect Roast Goose. Stuffing a bird like a turkey keeps the cavity area moist, but this is not that necessary with a goose.


Holiday Spectacular: How To Make Roast Goose

Award-winning British chef Gizzi Erskine has a new collection of recipes out to see you through the holiday cooking season (and then some!) While American and British holiday fare can differ greatly, rest assured that you’re in excellent hands. This roast goose is an impressive centerpiece for any holiday or special occasion table.

I wish I was allowed to eat goose on Christmas Day but my family have vetoed it, so I make sure I cook it in the run-up to Christmas. I’ve played around with so many different recipes, but the best way is to use the Chinese crispy duck technique to ensure really crisp thin skin and pink breast meat. This involves drenching it with ROASTING hot liquor that’s infused with Asian flavors (which incidentally transfer brilliantly as Christmas flavors). You then need to dry it overnight until the skin goes really waxy.

This is the best goose recipe I’ve tried, and the gravy is a winner.

Holiday Spectacular: How To Make Roast Goose

  • Prep Time: 25 minutes
  • Cook Time: 2-2 1/2 hours
  • Level of Difficulty: Easy
  • Serving Size: 6-8

Ingredients

  • 9 pints water
  • 3 star anise
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 5 slices fresh root ginger, bruised
  • 2 spring onions, split down the middle
  • 5 tablespoons maltose (if you really can't find it, use honey)
  • 4 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt flakes
  • 1 11-pound free-range goose, cleaned of its offal and excess fat
Gravy
  • The goose's neck and gizzards (if available)
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon plain flour
  • 3 1/2 ounces port
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 18 ounces fresh chicken stock
Chestnut, Apple & Prune Stuffing
  • 10 ounces hot orange juice
  • 3 1/2 ounces hot water
  • 2 ounces Armagnac
  • 3 1/2 ounces prunes
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 6 smoked streaky bacon rashers, chopped
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • A few thyme sprigs, leaves picked
  • 10 1/2 ounces sausage meat (or good-quality sausages, squeezed out of their skins)
  • The goose offal (liver and kidneys), roughly chopped (optional)
  • A handful fresh white breadcrumbs
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
  • 7 ounces peeled vacuum-packed chestnuts, roughly chopped
  • 1 large English apple, grated
  • Sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

For the stuffing

Pour the hot orange juice into a bowl and add the hot water, Armagnac and prunes. Leave to soak overnight. Next day, strain the prunes (discarding any excess liquid), then roughly chop and set aside.

Heat the butter in a frying pan. Add the bacon and fry for 5 minutes, until turning slightly golden. Add the onion and fry over a low-ish heat for 8 mintues, or until it has begun to soften. For the last minute of cooking, add the garlic and thyme.

Remove from the heat and put into a large mixing bowl with the sausagemeat, offal, breadcrumbs, parsley, chestnuts, apple, prunes and a good sprinkling of salt and pepper. Roll up your sleeves and get squelching it together, really giving it a good mix to make sure it's combined. Put it in a bowl and keep it in the fridge until you are ready to use it.

For the goose and gravy

Place the water, star anise, cinnamon, ginger, spring onions, maltose, soy and salt in a pan and bring to the boil. Turn off the heat and leave to infuse for 10 minutes. Prick the goose all over with a tiny needle. This takes quite a bit of time, but it’s worth it for really crispy skin, as it allows the fat to pour out of it. Place the goose in the sink and pour the boiling hot infused stock all over it (discard the stock afterwards). The idea is that the skin will tighten up. Now place on a wire rack and leave in the fridge to dry for 15 hours. The skin of the goose will feel like wax paper when it’s dry.

Now stuff the bird with your Chestnut, Apple & Prune Stuffing, then you need to weigh it.

Place a trivet or rack in a roasting tin and place the goose on top. Roast for 15 minutes, then reduce the oven temperature to 400°F and cook for 20 minutes per kilo for medium-rare, 30 minutes per kilo for well-done.

Remove the bird from the oven and leave to rest for 30 minutes. It’s worth noting that the goose will leak tons of its fat, which is terrific to keep for roasting your potatoes, but keep an eye on it and pour away the fat as you see fit.

When the goose is resting out of the roasting tray, remove the rack or trivet if you used one and place the roasting tray on the hob over a low-ish heat. Chop the goose neck into 4 through
the joint and brown the pieces in the tray with the gizzards.

Add the onion and cook for 4 minutes, or until a little soft and golden. Now add the flour and scrape away at the bottom of the pan to lift up all the meaty bits and goosey juices. Pour in the port and whisk like crazy. It will fast become a purple gunge. Now add the bay leaf and pour in the stock slowly, whisking as you go, until combined. Now bring the gravy to the boil and reduce until the flavor is right and it’s a good pouring consistency.


Watch the video: Roast goose with Christmas spices, black cherry gravy, goose-fat roast potatoes and mustard greens (August 2022).