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Police Investigate Suspicious Halloween Candy

Police Investigate Suspicious Halloween Candy


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Candy handed out at school seemed to have been tampered with

Police in Connecticut are investigating a box of candy from a school Halloween event that appeared to have been tampered with.

This weekend Connecticut police said some candy that had been given out at a school function may have been tampered with.

According to the Hartford Courant, a child at a Monster Mash event at a school in Clinton, Connecticut, was given a small box of Dots candy that appeared to have been opened and glued shut again. Normally there are many different colors of Dots in a box.

Police don’t know if anything was actually done to the Dots in question, but the package did appear to have been opened and then glued shut again. The Dots will be investigated at a lab, and in the meantime police have said that any kids at the Monster Mash event should check all the candy they acquired and not eat it if there is any chance it could have been tampered with.


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


2017 Tainted Halloween Candy Reports

Claim

Origin

Every year for decades children and adults alike have been hearing and passing along rumors of dangerously tainted Halloween candy: goodies laced with poison, drugs, razor blades, pins, needles, and other sorts of harmful substances randomly distributed to innocent trick-or-treaters by depraved pranksters. While documented cases of such tampering are rare (and in the case of poison, non-existent), these rumors persist, in part, because every year numerous cases of suspected candy tampering are reported by the news media in the days immediately following Halloween.

Nearly all such cases turn out to be nothing: they’re pranks played by children on their parents, siblings, or friends they’re false reports generated by attention-seeking children and adults they involve material that accidentally, rather than deliberately, ends up in children’s goodie bags or they’re examples of coincidence mistaken for causation (e.g., a person eats a piece of candy and shortly afterwards feels ill, then erroneously attributes the illness to tainted Halloween candy). But often no follow-ups are done on such news stories after the initial, unconfirmed reports, leaving the public with the impression that all of them involved genuine cases of tainted candy being distributed to trick-or-treaters. Below we’ve collected a round-up of such news stories from Halloween 2017, some of which may have already proved false:


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